The growth of carbon dioxide emissions has stopped, Ai Yi: “The first time in 40 years”

After experiencing the negative record in 2013, “a good surprise”, but “definitely not the time to use positive news as an excuse to avoid future plans”

In 2014, global carbon dioxide emissions stopped increasing for the first time in 40 years. It can be said that this is the figure of the International Energy Agency. In 2014, global carbon dioxide emissions were equal to 32 gigatons, the same as in 2013. After setting a negative record in 2013, United Nations data provided in the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) annual report showed that the carbon dioxide record for acid anhydride levels between 2012 and 2013 was the most significant increase in the past 30 years, which is the breath of the earth Fresh air.

AIE chief economist Fatih Birol (Fatih Birol) said: “This is a very significant surprise.” “This provides the negotiators with the impetus they need to prepare to reach a new global climate agreement in Paris in December: this is the first decoupling between economic growth and emissions.” But Maria Van der, Director of the US Agency for International Education Hoven warned that the results were “encouraging,” but “it is not the time to be complacent,” and that “it is certainly not the time to avoid future initiatives on the grounds of positive news.”

The agency explained that the reason for the good news is There has of course been a change in the energy implementation in China and OECD countries: “The transition to renewable energy has the expected effect of separating economic growth from the carbon dioxide trend.”

After experiencing the negative record in 2013, “a good surprise”, but “definitely not the time to use positive news as an excuse to avoid future plans”

In 2014, global carbon dioxide emissions stopped increasing for the first time in 40 years. It can be said that this is the figure of the International Energy Agency. In 2014, global carbon dioxide emissions were equal to 32 gigatons, the same as in 2013. After setting a negative record in 2013, United Nations data provided in the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) annual report showed that the carbon dioxide record for acid anhydride levels between 2012 and 2013 was the most significant increase in the past 30 years, which is the breath of the earth Fresh air.

AIE chief economist Fatih Birol (Fatih Birol) said: “This is a very significant surprise.” “This provides the negotiators with the impetus they need to prepare to reach a new global climate agreement in Paris in December: this is the first decoupling between economic growth and emissions.” But Maria Van der, Director of the US Agency for International Education Hoven warned that the results were “encouraging,” but “it is not the time to be complacent,” and that “it is certainly not the time to avoid future initiatives on the grounds of positive news.”

The agency explained that the reason for the good news is There has of course been a change in the energy implementation in China and OECD countries: “The transition to renewable energy has the expected effect of separating economic growth from the carbon dioxide trend.”