Complex challenges in a connected world - FFT Ecology News

Complex challenges in a connected world

One of the main conclusions of SOER 2010, EEA’s most important report, is obvious: “Environmental challenges are complex and cannot be solved in isolation.”

This only means that environmental issues are interrelated and are usually only part of the huge challenges facing us and our planet. The fact is that we live in a highly interconnected world, this world is composed of many different but interconnected systems, such as environment, society, economy, technology, politics, culture, etc. This is the world in which we live.

This global interconnectivity means that damage to one element can have an unexpected effect on another. The recent global financial crisis and aviation turmoil caused by the Icelandic volcano show how a sudden outage in one region can affect the entire system.

This interconnection is often referred to as “globalization” and is not a new phenomenon. In Europe, globalization allows us to flourish on a continent and play a leading role in the economy. At this stage, we used a lot of natural resources from ourselves and other countries. Our “footprint”, that is, our influence is huge, far beyond our borders.

Indeed, the driving force behind globalization is expected to have a significant impact on Europe and our environment in the future. Many of them are beyond our control. For example, by 2050, the world’s population will exceed 9 billion, which will have a huge impact on the environment. Most likely, the largest population growth rates will occur in Asia and Africa, while in the more developed countries (Europe, Japan, the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand), this growth rate is only about 3%.

Environmental challenges related to the causes of global change

Many recent trends are shaping the global context. Some are called “global megatrends” because they affect society, technology, economy, politics, and even the environment. The key developments include changes in population structure or the increase in the speed of urbanization, faster and faster technological progress, increasingly fierce market integration, and the evolution of economic power or climate change.

These trends have a major impact on global resource demand. Cities are expanding and consumption is increasing. The world expects continued economic growth. Production is geared to emerging economies. From an economic point of view, emerging economies will become increasingly important. Non-state actors can play a greater role in the global political process.

It is expected that technological change will accelerate. This “entry into the unknown” brings new risks, but at the same time it also provides huge opportunities.

The future impact of these “global megatrends” on the European environment is the theme of the SOER section and the basis of Segnali 2011. These key trends have a major impact on our global environment and resource management. Signals 2011 includes a section titled “Earth in 2050: Global Megatrends”, which analyzes the main trends and assesses their future impact on the European environment.

We cannot say exactly what the earth will look like in 2050. Many trends have been established. Their evolution depends on our choices today. In this sense, the future is in our hands. We try to make the right choice. Our grandchildren and anyone in our family in 2050 will thank us.

  • Sol 2010
  • Global trend
One of the main conclusions of SOER 2010, EEA’s most important report, is obvious: “Environmental challenges are complex and cannot be solved in isolation.”

This only means that environmental issues are interrelated and are usually only part of the huge challenges facing us and our planet. The fact is that we live in a highly interconnected world, this world is composed of many different but interconnected systems, such as environment, society, economy, technology, politics, culture, etc. This is the world in which we live.

This global interconnectivity means that damage to one element can have an unexpected effect on another. The recent global financial crisis and aviation turmoil caused by the Icelandic volcano show how a sudden outage in one region can affect the entire system.

This interconnection is often referred to as “globalization” and is not a new phenomenon. In Europe, globalization allows us to flourish on a continent and play a leading role in the economy. At this stage, we used a lot of natural resources from ourselves and other countries. Our “footprint”, that is, our influence is huge, far beyond our borders.

Indeed, the driving force behind globalization is expected to have a significant impact on Europe and our environment in the future. Many of them are beyond our control. For example, by 2050, the world’s population will exceed 9 billion, which will have a huge impact on the environment. Most likely, the largest population growth rates will occur in Asia and Africa, while in the more developed countries (Europe, Japan, the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand), this growth rate is only about 3%.

Environmental challenges related to the causes of global change

Many recent trends are shaping the global context. Some are called “global megatrends” because they affect society, technology, economy, politics, and even the environment. The key developments include changes in population structure or the increase in the speed of urbanization, faster and faster technological progress, increasingly fierce market integration, and the evolution of economic power or climate change.

These trends have a major impact on global resource demand. Cities are expanding and consumption is increasing. The world expects continued economic growth. Production is geared to emerging economies. From an economic point of view, emerging economies will become increasingly important. Non-state actors can play a greater role in the global political process.

It is expected that technological change will accelerate. This “entry into the unknown” brings new risks, but at the same time it also provides huge opportunities.

The future impact of these “global megatrends” on the European environment is the theme of the SOER section and the basis of Segnali 2011. These key trends have a major impact on our global environment and resource management. Signals 2011 includes a section titled “Earth in 2050: Global Megatrends”, which analyzes the main trends and assesses their future impact on the European environment.

We cannot say exactly what the earth will look like in 2050. Many trends have been established. Their evolution depends on our choices today. In this sense, the future is in our hands. We try to make the right choice. Our grandchildren and anyone in our family in 2050 will thank us.

  • Sol 2010
  • Global trend